Tag Archives: Christian education

For the Bookshelf: The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry

Root, Andrew, and Dean, Kendra Creasy, The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry (2011), InterVaristy Press, Downers Grove, Illinois.

By Guest Blogger Pat Olds

This book’s content is collection of published essays from Dr. Kendra Creasy Dean and Dr. Andrew Roots. It is a resource for reshaping or reframing a youth ministry that is more relational and relevant to the spiritual needs of 21st century youth. The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry offers practical theology as a means of connecting together the culture content and context of youth to biblical truths for Christ-centered reflective thinking and application that informs faith formation. Continue reading For the Bookshelf: The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry

Bad Teaching

By Israel Galindo, Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning

Polemics against bad teaching and poor education are a staple in social science, philosophy, and education literature. I suspect for two reasons: first, they are effective in getting readers riled up, and, second, I suspect it’s just too easy to sling tomatoes at poor teachers. After all, who among us hasn’t suffered under one? However, I do love a good rant… Continue reading Bad Teaching

A Faculty Coach Reflects on the Leadership in Ministry Experience

The Center for Lifelong Learning (CLL) has been offering the Leadership in Ministry workshops (LIM) on its campus since 2014. In 2017 it will expand the program and offer workshops in Boston, Portland, and Lost River WV. Fourteen faculty-coaches teach in the workshops. The CLL asked Dr. Israel Galindo to reflect on his experiences as a faculty coach in the Leadership in Ministry workshops. The workshops are part of the Pastoral Excellence Program of the Center for Lifelong Learning.

CLL: How long have you been a faculty-coach in LIM?

Dr. G: I joined the faculty in 1994 or 1995 at the invitation of Larry Matthews, founder and coordinator of the LIM workshops. I continued with LIM during my time as faculty at another seminary, but had to drop when I became dean there in 2010. Until this year I’d only participated in the West Virginia workshops.

CLL: What were your primary interests or motivations for becoming a LIM faculty member? Continue reading A Faculty Coach Reflects on the Leadership in Ministry Experience

For the Bookshelf: To Know as We Are Known

By guest blogger Nancy Rock Poti

In To Know As We Are Known: Education as a Spiritual Journey by Parker J. Palmer (San Francisco, CA: HarperOne, , 1993, 160 pp, $13.95 ISBN-10: 0060664517), author, activist, teacher and nationally recognized educational expert, offers a new model for knowing, learning and teaching. He engages the reader in an exploration of how mind and heart can work together in seeking truth, pointing to education for whole persons, which includes not only cognitive learning but also emotional learning. He admits that he is searching for a “holistic way” of knowing which can be translated into practical ways to teach and to learn. He seeks to offer through his writing “a way of knowing and educating that might heal rather then wound us and our world” (Palmer, p. 2), the latter of which he posits conventional education has indeed done in objectifying people and things. Continue reading For the Bookshelf: To Know as We Are Known

Why Are We Still Doing This? Moving From Fragmented Formation to Engaged Discipleship: Part II

By Andrew Kukla, MDiv ’03

[This is the second of a two-part blog post. See Part I here.]

If we want people to feel like they are the church and live their lives in the way of Jesus in an everyday reflective manner, we need to reach and teach and form them in that place! Theology has to happen in our contested spaces, not in clean quiet rooms away from the world.

  • If the church takes busy people and gives them more to do, we are creating stress and fatigue. There is literally nothing to learn here.
  • If we bring people into a sterile environment that looks nothing like their lives, there is nothing to be remembered here.
  • If we have no concept of how to layer formation from one story onto another in the narrative of God’s people, we are limited to superficial roots.
  • If we have ignored the sensory palate of existence, we are a one-note band.
  • And if we stay sitting we will continue to relegate ourselves to the sidelines of life, off-stage when the important conversation goes down.

So how do we change? Continue reading Why Are We Still Doing This? Moving From Fragmented Formation to Engaged Discipleship: Part II