Tag Archives: Galindo

For the Bookshelf: The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry

Root, Andrew, and Dean, Kendra Creasy, The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry (2011), InterVaristy Press, Downers Grove, Illinois.

By Guest Blogger Pat Olds

This book’s content is collection of published essays from Dr. Kendra Creasy Dean and Dr. Andrew Roots. It is a resource for reshaping or reframing a youth ministry that is more relational and relevant to the spiritual needs of 21st century youth. The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry offers practical theology as a means of connecting together the culture content and context of youth to biblical truths for Christ-centered reflective thinking and application that informs faith formation. Continue reading For the Bookshelf: The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry

For the Bookshelf: The Millennials: Connecting to America’s Largest Generation

Rainer, Thom S., Rainer, Jess W., The Millennials: Connecting to America’s Largest Generation. LifeWay Christian Research, B&H Publishing Group, Nashville, Tennessee, 2011.

By guest blogger Pat Olds

The context and content of this book is an “old school vs. new school” dialogue: interpretation and insight between two generations, a baby boomer father (1946-1964) and his Millennial adult son (1982-1994). The intergenerational dialogue is undergirded by a survey study of 1,200 Millennial adult respondents, males (51%) and females (49%); white (61%), African American (14%), Hispanic (19%), Asian (5%) and Multiethnic (1%). The categories surveyed and evaluated were norms, values, motivation, diversity between young and old, lifestyles, work environments, finances, future outlook, relationships – marriage, children, elders, friends, coworkers and mentors, leadership, communication and religion, soul views. The father-son millennial study of post-moderates life experiences reveals the character traits of “typical” Millennial adults includes: self-expressive, teachable, financially confused, technology savvy educated and opened to different world views.

The survey results characterized the millennial adults as being: Continue reading For the Bookshelf: The Millennials: Connecting to America’s Largest Generation

Bad Teaching

By Israel Galindo, Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning

Polemics against bad teaching and poor education are a staple in social science, philosophy, and education literature. I suspect for two reasons: first, they are effective in getting readers riled up, and, second, I suspect it’s just too easy to sling tomatoes at poor teachers. After all, who among us hasn’t suffered under one? However, I do love a good rant… Continue reading Bad Teaching

A Faculty Coach Reflects on the Leadership in Ministry Experience

The Center for Lifelong Learning (CLL) has been offering the Leadership in Ministry workshops (LIM) on its campus since 2014. In 2017 it will expand the program and offer workshops in Boston, Portland, and Lost River WV. Fourteen faculty-coaches teach in the workshops. The CLL asked Dr. Israel Galindo to reflect on his experiences as a faculty coach in the Leadership in Ministry workshops. The workshops are part of the Pastoral Excellence Program of the Center for Lifelong Learning.

CLL: How long have you been a faculty-coach in LIM?

Dr. G: I joined the faculty in 1994 or 1995 at the invitation of Larry Matthews, founder and coordinator of the LIM workshops. I continued with LIM during my time as faculty at another seminary, but had to drop when I became dean there in 2010. Until this year I’d only participated in the West Virginia workshops.

CLL: What were your primary interests or motivations for becoming a LIM faculty member? Continue reading A Faculty Coach Reflects on the Leadership in Ministry Experience

What Clergy Don’t Talk About

By Israel Galindo, Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning and Director of Online Education

Most pastors are good preachers, and some fine pulpiteers and wordsmiths. In their preaching and teaching ministry they need to cover a wide range of topics, issues, and subjects, from the Bible to contemporary complex social issues; from marriage to parenting to leadership. The image of addressing issues from cradle to grave, birth to death (or “womb to tomb”) is apt. There are, however, things clergy are not prone to talking about easily. Money issues, for example tend to be difficult for clergy, whether personal or church finances. Sexuality, race, politics can be difficult for some (though interestingly, not sports!). Personal struggles with depression, loneliness, feelings of incompetence, and crises of faith may be near the top of things clergy do not talk about—all to their detriment, and, to risk of spiritual and mental health. Continue reading What Clergy Don’t Talk About