Tag Archives: theological education

What Are Seminarians Like These Days?

By Israel Galindo, Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning

I recently received a surprise call from a former professor of mine. He was gracious and kind to call me to congratulate me on the new job. A former dean himself, I accepted his condolences, as well. It was one of those tender conversations of a teacher expressing gratification (if not relief) for a former student’s success. And it was an opportunity for a former student to express gratitude to a mentor and teacher who opened up future possibilities. Those are tender moments, and they happen too infrequently.

At one point in our conversation my former teacher, long retired now, asked, “So, what are seminarians like these days?” Continue reading What Are Seminarians Like These Days?

New Focus for ThM Program at Columbia Seminary

Columbia Theological Seminary is pleased to announce that they are now receiving applications for their newly focused Master of Theology (ThM) program for admissions starting in the fall of 2016. The ThM is a one-year full-time program for students who already have the MDiv degree or its equivalent and who wish to deepen their understanding of a particular area of study through reflection, research, and writing for the service of the Church.

“Previous graduates of this program have gone on to teach, lead churches, and pursue doctoral studies in a variety of areas,” said Martha Moore-Keish, Associate Professor of Theology and Director of the ThM Program. “This new version of our program features even more emphasis on developing research skills through close work with faculty mentors in research of mutual interest.” Continue reading New Focus for ThM Program at Columbia Seminary

For the Bookshelf: Religion in the New Millennium

By Israel Galindo, Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning

The collection of articles that comprise Religion in the New Millennium: Theology in the Spirit of Paul Tillich, are from presentations given at the gathering of international scholars of religion meeting in New Harmony, Indiana in June 1999. The writers were challenged to address current issues of faith and culture through the lens of Tillich’s theology, especially as developed in his classic work The Religious Situation (1926). Not all presenters and writers were students or experts on Tillich or his theology, and that makes for a frustrating sense of unevenness in reading through this volume. Continue reading For the Bookshelf: Religion in the New Millennium

Five Elements for Effective Instruction

By Israel Galindo, Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning

I’ve been reviewing video presentations for a project. Primarily I screen them for delivery rather than content. It’s amazing how many basic rules of good communication presenters break—consistently—even professional speakers and celebrated “master teachers.” The other side of the equation that puzzles me is the level of tolerance audiences seem to have for poor presentations. I wonder sometimes if we have seen so few well-delivered presentations that we have lowered our expectations, and therefore, demand so little of presenters. Most of the presentations I see are entertaining but not educational, even when they portend to be.

Continue reading Five Elements for Effective Instruction

For the Bookshelf: Ancient-Future Evangelism

By Israel Galindo, Associate Dean for Lifelong Learning

In Ancient-Future Evangelism: Making Your Church a Faith -Forming Community, Robert Webber, Myers Professor of Ministry at Northern Baptist Seminary continues the “ancient-future” theme from previous works, the Ancient-Future Worship website, Ancient-Future Faith, and anticipates the following volume, Ancient-Future Time. In this book Webber presents a model for evangelism and discipleship—and therein lies his worthy contribution to the subject of churches and evangelism: the authentic reclamation of evangelism as a vital part of what the church does as part of its disciple-making mission. Specifically, he reminds his readers that the Great Commission is “not only to evangelize, but to make disciples” (p. 13). Continue reading For the Bookshelf: Ancient-Future Evangelism